New suspension bushes.

Please restrict your questions and replies to Capri related technical issues!
User avatar
Brooksy
Donator
Donator
Posts: 81
Joined: Wed Sep 12, 2018 7:58 pm
Car(s): 1987 2.0 laser (fair weather car)

New suspension bushes.

Postby Brooksy » Mon Oct 01, 2018 6:56 pm

Hi
I want to replace the suspension bushes on my laser with the standard rubber ones and wondered if anyone had done the same and could suggest the best supplier? I see Tickover do some and but I also note Polyurethane bushes are a popular choice. However, I don't want to end up with a hard jittery ride and have more vibration transmitted into the cabin. I appreciate that there are for's and against's with both and am open to suggestions :?

Cheers.

Nige
NigeImage

User avatar
Andrew 2.8i
Donator
Donator
Posts: 11843
Joined: Sat Jan 25, 2014 7:38 pm
Car(s): '83 2.8 Injection (sunny days only)
'04 Toyota MR2 (owned from new)
Location: Ceredigion
Contact:

Re: New suspension bushes.

Postby Andrew 2.8i » Mon Oct 01, 2018 8:14 pm

Brooksy wrote: I see Tickover do some

Hi Nige,
Replacing the probably well aged bushes on your car is definitely a good idea. New ones will definitely firm the car up.
However, the problem with rubber bushes is that they aren't available to buy on their own. You can buy new front track control arms that will have new rubber bushes in, no problem. For the rear leaf spring bushes you will most probably have to buy the whole new spring sets in order to obtain those rubber bushes. As far as I'm aware, the rubber bushes for the front and rear anti roll bars aren't available to buy at all.
To cut a long story short, I would forget all about rubber bushes and buy a full set of Superflex poly bushes. You'll definitely notice an improvement in the feel of the car.
Why not meet up with another Capri owner who has fitted poly bushes on their car? You'll be able to see for yourself whether the ride is jittery or not. Then you'll be able to make a decision on whether the outlay is worth it. From memory, a full set of decent poly bushes (excluding the rear axle bumpstops) will be around £350.

Andrew.
Image

User avatar
Brooksy
Donator
Donator
Posts: 81
Joined: Wed Sep 12, 2018 7:58 pm
Car(s): 1987 2.0 laser (fair weather car)

Re: New suspension bushes.

Postby Brooksy » Mon Oct 01, 2018 8:33 pm

Andrew 2.8i wrote:
Brooksy wrote: I see Tickover do some

Hi Nige,
Replacing the probably well aged bushes on your car is definitely a good idea. New ones will definitely firm the car up.

Thanks for the advice and insight Andrew; I can see the practicality of replacing the bushes with polyurethane replacements.

Nige :cheers:
NigeImage

User avatar
Jasonmarie
Donator
Donator
Posts: 1914
Joined: Thu Aug 13, 2015 12:30 am
Car(s): Ford Capri 2.0 Laser Mercury Grey 1987 hobby
Mercedes Vito Traveline 2.2 Big Bus Daily Driver
Location: Kent

Re: New suspension bushes.

Postby Jasonmarie » Mon Oct 01, 2018 8:38 pm

I agree with what everybody is saying as do they need doing ? Also I think Tickover is cheaper then CCI if not a member ?
Ford Capri 2.0 Laser 1987 Mercury Grey ....... :beer:

User avatar
Andrew 2.8i
Donator
Donator
Posts: 11843
Joined: Sat Jan 25, 2014 7:38 pm
Car(s): '83 2.8 Injection (sunny days only)
'04 Toyota MR2 (owned from new)
Location: Ceredigion
Contact:

Re: New suspension bushes.

Postby Andrew 2.8i » Mon Oct 01, 2018 8:39 pm

Brooksy wrote:Thanks for the advice and insight Andrew; I can see the practicality of replacing the bushes with polyurethane replacements.

Hello again Nige,
It's best to get opinions from various sources, so wait to see what others have to say.
On the subject of practicality, I will add that the poly bushes are very much "fit and forget", you won't have to worry about worn bushes on the MOT test! Another benefit is that they can be fitted yourself with regular tools, although the old rubber bushes in the leaf springs will most likely have to be pressed out with a hydraulic press.

Andrew.
Image

User avatar
Brooksy
Donator
Donator
Posts: 81
Joined: Wed Sep 12, 2018 7:58 pm
Car(s): 1987 2.0 laser (fair weather car)

Re: New suspension bushes.

Postby Brooksy » Mon Oct 01, 2018 8:50 pm

Andrew 2.8i wrote:
Brooksy wrote:Thanks for the advice and insight Andrew; I can see the practicality of replacing the bushes with polyurethane replacements.

Hello again Nige,
It's best to get opinions from various sources, so wait to see what others have to say.

Agree, informed decisions and all that.

Seriously considering already though but won't be rushing into it.

Nige
NigeImage

stevemarl
Donator
Donator
Posts: 3686
Joined: Wed Jul 11, 2012 6:31 pm
Car(s): Capri 1.6 laser

Re: New suspension bushes.

Postby stevemarl » Tue Oct 02, 2018 9:17 am

pm sent

User avatar
pbar
Posts: 5242
Joined: Thu Jun 07, 2012 6:29 pm
Car(s): Capri 2.0 Laser, frequent driver.
Location: North-West

Re: New suspension bushes.

Postby pbar » Tue Oct 02, 2018 9:25 am

Brooksy wrote:Hi
I want to replace the suspension bushes on my laser with the standard rubber ones


Personally, I would stick with the standard rubber replacements, as you were thinking. And they are available.

User avatar
Brooksy
Donator
Donator
Posts: 81
Joined: Wed Sep 12, 2018 7:58 pm
Car(s): 1987 2.0 laser (fair weather car)

Re: New suspension bushes.

Postby Brooksy » Tue Oct 02, 2018 10:49 am

stevemarl wrote:pm sent


Cheers Steve. Good to know and great to have a balance of opinions.
NigeImage

User avatar
Andrew 2.8i
Donator
Donator
Posts: 11843
Joined: Sat Jan 25, 2014 7:38 pm
Car(s): '83 2.8 Injection (sunny days only)
'04 Toyota MR2 (owned from new)
Location: Ceredigion
Contact:

Re: New suspension bushes.

Postby Andrew 2.8i » Wed Oct 10, 2018 7:19 am

Hi Nige,
I've sent you a PM.

Andrew.
Image

User avatar
nigecapri
Posts: 5716
Joined: Mon Jul 28, 2008 6:31 am
Car(s): Black 2.0S with supercharged bike carbs.
Location: http://www.blacklabradorpuppies.co.uk/
Contact:

Re: New suspension bushes.

Postby nigecapri » Fri Oct 12, 2018 8:06 am

I've used polies for decades and they do have the advantage of not needing replacement every few years. They also firm up the steering giving a much more precise reaction to your input. Some grease on the moving faces will prevent squeaking, some suppliers include it in the package - mine have never squeaked.
The inboard radius arm bushes need checking for the length of the inner crush-tube which if too long can allow the metal bush casing to move about & give wheel wobble (this also happens with rubber bushes.) I took a couple of mill off them both. Look up into it when fitted to see if any shiny metal is still visible.
Outer radius arm bushes which take the ARB are the ones needing plenty lube as there is a lot of twist going on all the time. The dished washers are fitted so you put the first one cupped over the end of the ARB and the other one so the nut sits in the cup.
Front Anti-Roll-Bar mounts - same as for those in the radius arms - plenty grease. These also help with braking stability as they greatly reduce the amount that the roll bar can pull backwards into them on heavy braking (and cornering.) Soft & worn rubber here along with dicky callipers can give very scary braking, weaving from side to side.
If your leaf spring bushes are o.k. then leave them alone, it's a huge job to swap them and they are the ones which will give most N.V.H. especially the forward ones.
Bump stops are a bit of a luxury in poly, I'd rather spend the money on chocolate!

User avatar
Brooksy
Donator
Donator
Posts: 81
Joined: Wed Sep 12, 2018 7:58 pm
Car(s): 1987 2.0 laser (fair weather car)

Re: New suspension bushes.

Postby Brooksy » Fri Oct 12, 2018 11:11 am

nigecapri wrote:I've used polies for decades and they do have the advantage of not needing replacement every few years. They also firm up the steering giving a much more precise reaction to your input. Some grease on the movin :cheers: g faces will prevent squeaking, some suppliers include it in the package - mine have never squeaked.
The inboard radius arm bushes need checking for the length of the inner crush-tube which if too long can allow the metal bush casing to move about & give wheel wobble (this also happens with rubber bushes.) I took a couple of mill off them both. Look up into it when fitted to see if any shiny metal is still visible.
Outer radius arm bushes which take the ARB are the ones needing plenty lube as there is a lot of twist going on all the time. The dished washers are fitted so you put the first one cupped over the end of the ARB and the other one so the nut sits in the cup.
Front Anti-Roll-Bar mounts - same as for those in the radius arms - plenty grease. These also help with braking stability as they greatly reduce the amount that the roll bar can pull backwards into them on heavy braking (and cornering.) Soft & worn rubber here along with dicky callipers can give very scary braking, weaving from side to side.
If your leaf spring bushes are o.k. then leave them alone, it's a huge job to swap them and they are the ones which will give most N.V.H. especially the forward ones.
Bump stops are a bit of a luxury in poly, I'd rather spend the money on chocolate!


Hi Nige

Thanks for your detailed message, very useful and I'll remember to check the points you mention.

Couldn't agree more on the chocolate front!

Cheers

Nige
NigeImage